Best Pubs | South West England

We have selected 200 of our favourite pubs in England. We visit every recommendation & take all our own photography. (It’s a tough job)

The Pony and Trap, Bristol

The Pony & Trap in Chew Magna has held a Michelin Star since 2011 and was ranked 2nd in the Estrella Damm Top 50 UK Gastropubs in 2018. The “field to fork” ethos of the pub ensures that ingredients are sourced as locally as possible from suppliers around the Chew Valley and the South West.

The Pandora Inn, Cornwall

The Poet in Matfield has recently benefitted from a complete renovation. The restaurant sits within a 17th Century building named after war poet Siegfried Sassoon, who was born and raised in Matfield.

The Gurnard’s Head, Cornwall

A landmark pub almost at the edge of England, the Gurnard’s Head is your last stop for a pint and an open fire before the Atlantic Ocean. Between St Just and Zennor, this is genuine Cornwall. Wild, mysterious and beautiful, the Gurnard’s Head is an inn that transports you back to when travel was that little bit slower.

The Port William, Cornwall

A cut above many Cornish inns, The Port William makes the most of its coastal location with floor-to-ceiling glazing in the restaurant, framing vast Atlantic views. Already a hotspot with surfers, you can enjoy a meal by the sea on a sunny day or cosy up and watch the lashing waves from a comfy spot beside the toasty wood burner.

The Ship Inn, Cornwall

Full of Cornish character and charm, the Ship Inn in Mousehole is a friendly pub with eight comfortable rooms offering splendid views of the sea and quaint Mousehole harbour. The bar and restaurant serve fresh local food all year round and the traditional Cornish pub food is accompanied by the excellent St. Austell ales.

The Blue Peter Inn, Cornwall

Sitting on the harbour wall of the stunning village of Polperro, the Blue Peter Inn offers a warm welcome to all comers. They offer great beer, food, superb views and live music for which its fame has spread far and wide. They do their best to ensure the journey from the sea to your plate is a short one which isn’t difficult given their location. 15A_Cornwall.jpg

The Golden Lion, Cornwall

This 18th-century pub in Port Isaac is awash with charm and history. Overlooking the stunning bay makes this an ideal spot to watch the beautiful blues of summer calm and the dramatic greys of winter storms. The Golden Lion takes pride in their cask ale and serves a fine fish and chips.

The Ship Inn, Cornwall

The pub’s position gives them great access to some of the finest fish in the British Isles and their home cooking truly has the taste of Cornwall in every dish. Low ceilings, wooden beams and open fires add to the cosy character.

The Old Custom House, Cornwall

Nestled within the harbour of Padstow is the Old Custom House, a B&B and restaurant known for its excellent quality and service. There is a stylish and intimate bar along with comfortable guest rooms and a well-equipped spa. The Old Custom House directly overlooks the bustling harbour and sits in the midst of the hustle and bustle of this attractive harbour

The Star & Garter, Cornwall

Full of Cornish character and charm, the Ship Inn in Mousehole is a friendly pub with eight comfortable rooms offering splendid views of the sea and quaint Mousehole harbour. The bar and restaurant serve fresh local food all year round and the traditional Cornish pub food is accompanied by the excellent St. Austell ales.

The Tinner’s Arms, Cornwall

The Tinner’s Arms is a traditional pub that is the beating heart of Zennor, and is one of Cornwall’s hidden gems. This Grade II listed, 13th century pub has stone floors, low ceilings and inglenook fireplaces.

The Blisland Inn, Cornwall

Having served over 1,370 real ales since opening The Blisland Inn, husband and wife team Gary and Margaret Marshall would be justified in renaming this pub the Bodmin Moor boozer. You only need to enter the bar to see the walls covered in ale paraphernalia and it won’t be long before a hand-pulled drink is in your hand. It’s an eclectic, lively setting where a friendly greeting is guaranteed.

The St Tudy Inn, Cornwall

Simple food, served exceptionally. A charming village pub, The St Tudy Inn’s seasonal menu has earned it Michelin acclaim that travels far beyond Cornwall’s borders. It is executive chef Emily Scott’s passion that propels this inn onto the culinary map, with ingredients echoing the seasons and making the most of what land and sea can produce.

The Rock Inn, Devon

In the breath-taking Dartmoor National Park, The Rock Inn has been earning AA rosettes for over two decades. Timber beams, antique furniture and cosy features give the inn all the welcome trimmings of an intimate country pub. Locally grown, reared and caught meat, fish and produce make it onto the plates here in contemporary combinations. The food is so successful that the restaurant is often booked out.

The Bearslake Inn, Devon

The Bearslake Inn in Lake Sourton is a traditional, Grade II listed thatched roof pub nestled within the beautiful North West corner of Dartmoor. Bear or be-re comes from the old Devon word meaning wooded place and Lake is the hamlet where the farm is located; so the original name may have meant the wooded place in Lake.

The Millbrook Inn, Devon

Situated in the village of South Pool in the heart of the South Hams, this idyllic spot can also be reached by boat from Salcombe when the tide is right. It is easy to reach from the local s of Kingsbridge and Dartmouth.

The Crabshell Inn, Devon

The Crabshell Inn has impressive views thanks to its enviable quayside position. You can watch estuary life from both inside and outside the restaurant. “Joyous, indulgent, freshly prepared fine food that loves to be enjoyed with friends and family,” is the Crabshell Inn’s philosophy.

The Thatch, Devon

In the heart of Devon’s surfing capital, The Thatch at Croyde, close to Braunton, is a lively pub inside a charmingly old 16th-century stone and thatch shell. Their menu tells the same story, featuring traditional pub classics alongside modern musts like burgers and nachos. There’s plenty of seating out the front if you’d like to enjoy the sun, while the beamed, vaulted dining room offers a traditional space inside.

The Ferry Inn, Devon

Situated next to the harbour wall and overlooking the ombré blue water of picturesque Salcombe Harbour, is The Ferry Inn. Owning one of the best positions in this beautiful region with its rolling hills and golden sands, the terrace which sits parallel to the water, is one of the best spots for a drink in Salcombe.

The Museum Inn, Dorset

The Museum Inn’s sleepy, country style with character red brick walls and a thatched roof make the forward-thinking menu served inside an exciting surprise. The fare is seasonal and contemporary, a striking contrast to the inn’s character interior. It’s ideal for tourists and locals alike, because the seasonality means the dishes won’t stay the same for long.

The Inn at Cranborne, Dorset

The Tinner’s Arms is a traditional pub that is the beating heart of Zennor, and is one of Cornwall’s hidden gems. This Grade II listed, 13th century pub has stone floors, low ceilings and inglenook fireplaces.

The Bull, Dorset

Just a few miles from Dorset’s sought-after Jurassic Coast, the award-winning Bull Hotel has welcomed guests for centuries since its beginnings as a 16th-century coaching inn. The food is expertly prepared and beautifully presented, with something for everyone across its five menus.

The Erbrington Arms, Gloucestershire

Once voted the UK’s favourite pub, The Ebrington Arms has oodles of country appeal. Visitors will love the honey-stone walls covered in wisteria, spacious garden for sunny days and quiet village setting, under 10 minutes from the sought-after Cotswolds of Chipping Campden. The menu is hearty, warming and features plenty of pub favourites, earning it AA rosette acclaim.

The Old Stocks Inn, Gloucestershire

A hidden gem in the Cotswolds, The Old Stocks Inn is an enchanting fusion of new and old. Inside the honey-stone, 17th-century walls, suspended light bulbs hang beside centuries-old beams and retro, colour block chairs contrast restored stone. The team have built a menu to match, with artisan coffees, locally sourced ingredients and a quirky café to boot.

The Seagrave Arms, Gloucestershire

The Cotswolds are at the heart of what Chipping Campden’s The Seagrave Arms offers. Local gin, local ales, local ingredients, grown, cooked and eaten in the same Cotswolds countryside – it’s an appealing proposition made even greater by the pub’s curb appeal. Boasting Georgian proportions clad with Cotswolds’ stone, it seems the pub’s present-day ethos was woven into the building centuries ago.

The Butchers Arms, Gloucestershire

The Butchers Arms is a charming country pub in the Gloucestershire countryside of Michelin-starred fame. Run by husband and wife team, Mark and Jo-Anne Block carefully balance their culinary offering with the needs of the loyal crowd of locals who regularly meet for a drink. As such, sitting down to eat here is a far from stuffy experience. On the contrary, the atmosphere buzzes with greetings and conversation in cosy, character surrounds as patrons sample the day’s cask-served ale.

The Lion Inn, Gloucestershire

Half an hour from Cheltenham, The Lion Inn in Winchcombe heralds a true Cotswolds retreat. The 15th-century coaching inn underwent a sympathetic renovation in 2011 and is now home to a rustic restaurant, cosy snug and comfortable bedrooms., with quirky character features.

The Slaughters Country Inn, Gloucestershire

You’d be hard-pushed to find a more picturesque location than Upper and Lower Slaughter in the Cotswolds, and it’s in the latter that you’ll find The Slaughters Country Inn. This traditional inn welcomes walkers in their droves, as well as local residents and hotel guests.

The Amberley Inn, Gloucestershire

The Amberley Inn is perched on the corner of the quaint Cotswolds village that gives the pub its name. Rolling countryside extends in every direction, making it a hub for walkers descending from the hills of Minchinhampton Common. Mullioned windows, golden stone and parquet flooring pay homage to the inn’s 19th century past.

The Royal Oak, Gloucestershire

Situated next to the harbour wall and overlooking the ombré blue water of picturesque Salcombe Harbour, is The Ferry Inn. Owning one of the best positions in this beautiful region with its rolling hills and golden sands, the terrace which sits parallel to the water, is one of the best spots for a drink in Salcombe.

The Swan, Gloucestershire

The Swan Inn is a traditional 16th century family-run pub in the peaceful market town of Lechlade. Situated on the edge of the picturesque Cotswolds, the pub is close to the River Thames where scenic boat tours can be taken, or you can walk the Thames Footpath.

The Feathered Nest, Oxfordshire

The Feathered Nest is a former Malthouse, refurbished from the ground up in 2009 to become the family-run inn that it is today. Located on the Gloucestershire-Oxfordshire border, 20 minutes from the ever-popular of Chipping Norton, the pub now enjoys a fine reputation that has earned it three AA rosettes.

The Old Swan, Oxfordshire

The Old Swan & Minster Mill is an exceptional, quintessential country inn and boutique hotel in the heart of Oxfordshire. Beamed ceilings, roaring log fires and rugged flag-stone floors feature next to luxuriously classic interiors. The outdoor terrace and picturesque gardens are a treat during the summer months.

The Lion, Oxfordshire

The Lion at Wendlebury is a beautiful Cotswold stone 18th century pub in Oxfordshire with an emphasis on using the highest quality, locally-sourced ingredients. The light and contemporary interior features a blazing log fire, original features and a cozy ambiance.

The Wheatsheaf, Somerset

The Wheatsheaf was originally a farmhouse built in 1576 and parts of the present building date back to the 16th century. Today the pub preserves the best of its past, with its beautiful interior features whilst enhancing its contemporary style and exceptional approach to food, serving only the very best of local and home grown produce.

The Hare and Hounds, Somerset

With some of the finest views over Bath’s spectacular countryside, the Hare & Hounds is a tranquil spot to enjoy breathtaking views from their terrace, whilst indulging in their popular menus, created using local produce.

The Marlborough Tavern, Somerset

The Marlborough Tavern is a pub with stripped back elegance in the heart of Bath. With an emphasis on quality local and seasonal food, the pub is situated in a golden hued Bath Stone building with an outside terrace.

The Litton, Somerset

The Litton is a beautiful and sympathetically restored, award-winning country pub and boutique hotel. Menus are inspired by the seasons and by local, sustainable ingredients. The cuisine fuses modern British highlights with influences from continental Europe.

The Redan Inn, Somerset

Nestled into the old village of Chilcompton, The Redan Inn has been lovingly refurbished and has since been returned to its historical status as an Inn. With a sophisticated bar hosting a gin collection of over 100 bottles, local ales and international lagers, the interior is light with accents of inky blue and dark wood, a cozy wood-burner and candlelight.

The Talbot Inn, Somerset

The Talbot Inn in the village of Mells is a stylish pub situated in a historic and traditional 15th Century Inn. There is a main bar, snug, courtyard and map room which are all open every day for classic pub food and drink. Upstairs there are eight classically elegant bedrooms with crisp Egyptian cotton sheets, smart TVs and roll top baths.

The Pier House, St Austell

The Pier House’s position beside the bay is a charming one and the bustling harbour offers a quaint view from the terrace or seats inside. A stone chimney, parquet flooring and more than one nod to the nautical give the pub distinctive coastal appeal. The dining area is relaxed, but with a more refined feel – an authentic setting to enjoy the pub’s locally sourced produce.

The George Townhouse, Warwickshire

The George house in Shipston is an attractively spacious modern Pub with 15 luxurious rooms and fine cuisine. In 2016 it received an extensive makeover that has transformed it into the destination pub it is today. From breakfast through to dinner the standard of food is top-notch, with decent service to match.

The Howard Arms, Warwickshire

A relaxed country pub, The Howard Arms is Ilmington’s hub and overlooks the quaint village green. Living up to every expectation of a country idyll, flower-laden window boxes pepper the exterior while chunky flagstone floors, open fires and deep, comfy armchairs await in the bar.

Best Pubs | South West England

We have selected 200 of our favourite pubs in England. We visit every recommendation & take all our own photography. (It’s a tough job)

The Compasses Inn, Wiltshire

The Compasses Inn delivers on every expectation of a traditional Wiltshire pub. It’s steeped in history, dating back to the 14th-century, and indulges idyllic visions of country life. Settling down beside the inglenook fireplace with the manager’s renowned Bloody Mary or a pint of Butcombe Ale, you could imagine doing the same a hundred years earlier.

The King John Inn, Wiltshire

Hearty, homemade fare in a heritage setting, The King John Inn on the border of Wiltshire and Dorset is a destination in its own right. Relax into a Chesterfield sofa or wander through the Victorian tiered gardens with a drink to start, then take a seat in the rustic restaurant for the main event.

The Red Lion Inn, Wiltshire

At the heart of Cricklade’s high street you’ll find The Red Lion Inn, which has been the locals’ boozer of choice since the 1600s. But while the building retains its character features and purpose of old, one glance at the beer menu unearths a modern surprise. Since 2012, the inn has expanded to include its own on-site brewery, known as The Hop Kettle Brewery. You can try their beers at the bar, alongside an exciting line-up of smoked beer, bitters, pale ales, stouts and ciders.

The Castle Inn, Wiltshire

This Wiltshire pub has an enviable waterfront position in the enchanting Cotswold village of Castle Combe. Dating back to the 12th-century, the inn has been elegantly restored to make the most of its heritage stonework and charming features, while providing a taste of country luxury to please patrons of today.

The Northey Arms, Wiltshire

The Northey Arms is a beautiful honey coloured stone pub close to the city of Bath with an imposing exterior. Steeped in history, having been frequented in the past by the world-famous English Playwright Noel Coward, the interiors are contemporary and light and the menu is locally renowned.

The Bell, Wiltshire

The Bell is an award-winning pub in Ramsbury near Marlborough. Head chef Jonas Lodge sources as much as possible from their kitchen garden and the wider Ramsbury Estate, ensuring the cuisine is fresh and inspired by the seasons. The interior reflects the country classic spirit of the menu, with roaring fires, wooden floors and comfortable seating.

The Beckford Arms, Wiltshire

The Beckford Arms is a traditional country pub infused with contemporary style, located on the edge of the stunning rolling parkland of the Fonthill Estate in south Wiltshire close to Stonehenge and Salisbury. The menus are seasonal and use local ingredients where possible, supporting local growers and ensuring the best produce, some of which is grown in their own kitchen garden.

The Royal Oak, Wiltshire

Tucked away in the Nadder Valley, The Royal Oak has been an inn since 1852. The pub is set in the beautiful village of Swallowcliffe and nestled in a little dell. A recent refurbishment has created a beautiful mix of old and new, with traditional thick beams and stone fireplaces as well as stylish wooden furniture by local designer Matthew Burt and an on-trend colour palette.

The Red Lion, Wiltshire

“We’re just a couple of chefs working to create a place with real soul – where the food has personality, the surroundings are relaxed and the hospitality is warm and sincere”, say Guy and Brittany Manning, chefs and owners of the thatched roofed Red Lion Freehouse. The is a modest description based on the reputation of this pub and its exceptional cuisine which has been awarded a Michelin star.

Timbrells Yard, Wiltshire

Timbrell’s Yard is a stylish and contemporary riverside inn in the heart of Bradford-on-Avon. High ceilings, stripped wooden floor and an abundance of natural light from its large windows set the backdrop to the restaurant area which manages to cleverly fuse reclaimed furnishings with industrial lighting.
37a
The Best Pubs of
19A_York
The Best Pubs of
110a_Cornwall
The Best Pubs of
856A_Sussex
The Best Pubs of
163c
The Best Pubs of
U24B-1024x683
The Best Pubs of

Download a free sample

  • We respect your privacy and will never share your details.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
As featured in…
Sign up for our Newsletter
Once a month via email

Our newsletter contains the favourite places across the country which we visit and photograph each month. We also include offers and discounts for our books.

  • We respect your privacy and will never share your details.
static1.squarespace.com_-250x250
Best of England
Customer Reviews:
What people are saying:

All imagery is © SJR Studio Ltd 2010 – 2017. No usage of imagery is permitted under any circumstances. By using this site, you agree to our terms and conditions and privacy policy

Copyright © 2017 SJR Studio Ltd. All rights reserved. Company No: 09679054. VAT Number 222589503

if_facebook_online_social_media_734399
if_instagram_online_social_media_734394
if_online_social_media_twitter_734377